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Dr. Nils Rauer

Dr. Nils Rauer Dr. Nils Rauer, Rechtsanwalt, ist Partner im Frankfurter Büro von Hogan Lovells und leitet dort den Bereich Intellectual Property, Media & Technology (IPMT). Nils Rauer hat sich auf den Bereich des gewerblichen Rechtsschutzes spezialisiert und berät vorwiegend Mandanten in der Finanz-, Healthcare sowie der Automobilbranche. Beratungsschwerpunkt sind neben dem Daten- und Know-how-Schutz insbesondere das Urheber- und Markenrecht sowie das Wettbewerbsrecht (UWG). Nils Rauer verfügt über eine große Expertise bei der Entwicklung und Verhandlung von Lizenz-, Kooperations- und Outsourcing-Verträgen. Zudem berät er regelmäßig beim Aufbau von Compliance-Strukturen vor allem in mittelständischen Unternehmen. Nils Rauer verfügt des Weiteren über eine breite Erfahrung in der Prozessführung, insbesondere im Bereich des einstweiligen Rechtsschutzes. Den Schwerpunkt bilden hier vor allem urheberrechtliche und wettbewerbsrechtliche Verfahren sowie die Durchsetzung von Unterlassungs- und Auskunftstiteln. Nils Rauer ist Mitglied der Deutschen Vereinigung für gewerblichen Rechtschutz und Urheberrecht (GRUR) sowie der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Recht und Informatik (DGRI). Er ist Gastdozent an der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz und Referent der Akademie des Deutschen Buchhandels. Zudem hält er regelmäßig Vorträge zu aktuellen Themen des IP- und IT-Rechts und publiziert in der Tages- und Fachpresse

Posts by Dr. Nils Rauer

Digital Single Market: Draft Copyright Directive – What is the current state of the European ancillary copyright for publishers?

The ever-lasting discussion regarding the implementation of a European ancillary copyright for press publishers has now entered the next round. In March 2017, MEP Therese Comodini Cachia, who then was the rapporteur of the European Parliament’s committee on legal affairs (JURI), spoke out against such a right (report), after the Commission had envisaged such a

EU institutions vote for more books for blind and visually impaired people

Four years after signing the Marrakesh Treaty (introduced by the WIPO) to Facilitate Access to Published Works for Persons who are Blind, Visually Impaired, or otherwise Print Disabled, the EU institutions finally voted for its implementation. With over 600 votes, the European Parliament adopted the final compromise on 6 July 2017. The European Council ratified

DSM Watch: On your marks! Deadline for EU online Portability Regulation compliance is 20 March 2018

In our 21 June blog we reported that the text of this, the first legislative proposal published by the Commission under the Digital Single Market strategy banner, had been finalised by the European Parliament and Council.  The Regulation on ensuring the cross-border portability of online content services in the internal market ((EU) 2017/1128), to give

DSM Watch: EU online content services Portability Regulation will become law in its current form: Council adoption 8 June 2017

DSM Watch has been tracking this, the first legislative proposal published by the Commission under the Digital Single Market strategy banner, since back in December 2015.  The Commission’s aim was to allow consumers who pay for online content services in their home country to access them when visiting another country within the EU. In our

Europe reforms its Copyright

The Digital Single Market is gradually taking shape. We have seen quite some legislative activity since the European Commission first announced the Digital Single Market Strategy in May 2015. On 10 May this year, the Commission published a mid-term review evaluating what has been achieved. With the aim of creating an Internet without barriers throughout

CJEU to rule on press publishers’ neighbouring right

With decision of 8 May 2017, the regional Court of Berlin referred to questions for preliminary ruling to the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU). The court is concerned whether the rules on the press publishers’ neighbouring right – as implemented into German copyright law in 2013 – were properly enacted back then.

Digital Single Market: Commission takes stock at halftime

The European Commission is taking stock of what has been accomplished regarding its Strategy for a Digital Single Market. Two years ago, on 6 May 2015, Commissioners Oettinger and Ansip announced their strategy to create a single European market in the online world. Such market should rest on three pillars: (1) better access for consumers

CJEU rules on sale of multimedia players with add-ons to illegal streaming websites

There is no end in sight regarding CJEU decisions on the meaning of “communication to the public“. On 26 April 2017, the European Court of Justice (CJEU) ruled (C-527/15 – Filmspeler) that the sale of a multimedia player with pre-installed add-ons that contained links to illegal streaming websites constitutes a copyright infringement. At the same

DSM Watch: The new copyright directive – What will happen to the liability privilege of platforms?

Since the first proposals for amendments to the European Commission’s draft copyright directive were leaked earlier this month, we have seen quite some discussion on what the Digital Single Market will bring about. The leaked report was drafted by the European Parliament’s Committee on Legal Affairs. MEP Therese Comodini Cachia takes responsibility over the subject.

DSM Watch: Leaked European Parliament comments may modify press rights under Copyright Directive

The European commission published its last draft directive on the modernizing of the European copyright law (COM(2016) 593 final) on 14 September 2016. The draft was part of a larger strategy to bring about a single digital market within the European Union. Back then, the legislative proposal triggered quite some discussion given that its provisions

EU Commission agrees new rules allowing Europeans to watch online content services across EU borders

On 7 February, negotiators for the European Parliament, Member States and the Commission agreed the proposal for a regulation on EU cross-border portability of online content services. This is the first agreement relating to the modernisation of EU copyright rules proposed by the Commission as part of the Digital Single Market strategy. Under the new

EU Advocate General in favour of finding copyright infringement by indexing site The Pirate Bay

The cases that deal with the meaning of “communication to the public” continue: in a current reference for a preliminary ruling, the European Court of Justice (CJEU) will have to decide whether the operators of websites that index content available on peer-to-peer (P2P) networks, such as The Pirate Bay, infringe copyright when there is no

Germany: WUNDER-BAUM Air Freshener is a famous trademark

Julius Sämann Ltd. wins with Hogan Lovells before German Supreme Court (Case Ref.: I ZR 75/15) Almost everyone knows the “WUNDER-BAUM” Tree hanging from the rear view mirror of so many cars. Behind this little air freshener stands a sophisticated trademark strategy the rights holders have followed for many decades. Ever since the 1950s, when

CJEU: Exceptions of InfoSoc do not cover out-of-commerce works

Is it permitted to reproduce out-of-commerce works and make them publicly accessible under European copyright exceptions? So far, there is no explicit regulation at European level dealing with out-of-commerce works. However, a few member states, including Germany, have already complemented their copyright by way of introduction of new provisions governing the use that one can

CJEU: Landmark decision on digital lending of e-books

On 10 November 2016, the European Court of Justice (CJEU) rendered a landmark decision on the lending of e-books. Public libraries may rely on statutory copyright exceptions when lending out e-books and are not required to obtain a contractual license explicitly covering such e-lending right. With its decision, the CJEU applies the same legal principles

Germany: YouTube and GEMA reach a licensing agreement on music videos

For years, a great number of music videos generally available on YouTube have been blocked in Germany. The standard message Internet users could read was “This video is not available in Germany“. Those days belong to the past since earlier this week, as a long-lasting dispute between the German collecting society GEMA and YouTube has been

CJEU: Advocate General comments on radio and TV in hotel rooms

Guests entering hotel rooms expect to be able to turn on the TV or listen to the radio. Accordingly, TVs and radios feature in almost any hotel room around the world. However, this commodity has been the trigger for numerous legal disputes in recent years. As always, the quarrel is about money. In this post

CJEU decides once again on sale of used software

In 2012 and in the context of the well-known decision UsedSoft, the European Court of Justice (CJEU) decided on the sale of used software that has been purchased online via a download (3 July 2012, C‑128/11). There the CJEU clarified that the same rules and in particular the principle of exhaustion apply to software regardless