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Nils Rauer

Nils Rauer Dr. Nils Rauer, Rechtsanwalt, ist Partner im Frankfurter Büro von Hogan Lovells und leitet dort den Bereich Intellectual Property, Media & Technology (IPMT). Nils Rauer hat sich auf den Bereich des gewerblichen Rechtsschutzes spezialisiert und berät vorwiegend Mandanten in der Finanz-, Healthcare sowie der Automobilbranche. Beratungsschwerpunkt sind neben dem Daten- und Know-how-Schutz insbesondere das Urheber- und Markenrecht sowie das Wettbewerbsrecht (UWG). Nils Rauer verfügt über eine große Expertise bei der Entwicklung und Verhandlung von Lizenz-, Kooperations- und Outsourcing-Verträgen. Zudem berät er regelmäßig beim Aufbau von Compliance-Strukturen vor allem in mittelständischen Unternehmen. Nils Rauer verfügt des Weiteren über eine breite Erfahrung in der Prozessführung, insbesondere im Bereich des einstweiligen Rechtsschutzes. Den Schwerpunkt bilden hier vor allem urheberrechtliche und wettbewerbsrechtliche Verfahren sowie die Durchsetzung von Unterlassungs- und Auskunftstiteln. Nils Rauer ist Mitglied der Deutschen Vereinigung für gewerblichen Rechtschutz und Urheberrecht (GRUR) sowie der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Recht und Informatik (DGRI). Er ist Gastdozent an der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz und Referent der Akademie des Deutschen Buchhandels. Zudem hält er regelmäßig Vorträge zu aktuellen Themen des IP- und IT-Rechts und publiziert in der Tages- und Fachpresse

Posts by Nils Rauer

Germany: No indirect liability for open Wifi

At the end of July, the German Federal Court handed down its judgment in a copyright case having huge impact for operators of open Wifi services. For the first time, the judges had to deal with Sec. 7 (4) and Sec. 8 (1) s. 2 of the German Telemedia Act (hereinafter “GTA“) as lately amended.

CJEU: Re-posting content is a “communication to the public”

Copying an image from a website and using it for one’s own purposes, e.g. the illustration of a memo which eventually happens to be uploaded to another website – this happens a hundred times every day. However, such conduct is a copyright infringement. This is the clear answer the Court of Justice of the European

Can a taste be protected by copyright in Europe?

This is, in essence, the fundamental question that has been submitted to the CJEU in the case C-310/17 (Levola Hengelo v. Smile Foods). The opinion of Advocate General Wathelet (read it here, no English version yet) released on 25 July 2018 is that the taste of food (in this case of cheese) is not protectable

A second market for “used” e-books – CJEU will decide

Ever since the European Court of Justice (CJEU) in its highly regarded UsedSoft ruling declared the resale of “used” software admissible (dated 3 July 2012, C-128/11), the discussion has persistently centered around the question whether the idea of the so-called exhaustion, upon which UsedSoft is essentially based, could or should be extended to other digital

The EU Commission is set to address the challenges of three-dimensional printing

Additive manufacturing, more commonly called “three-dimensional printing” or simply “3D printing“, is a truly fascinating technology. Whilst the first experiments date back to the 1960s, with the first meaningful industrial applications following in the 1980s, only throughout the last couple of years has the technology really gained momentum. Meanwhile, the market is growing rapidly. The

DSM Watch: One step closer to a European copyright reform

After a long and intense debate – including several postponements – the Committee of Legal Affairs of the European Parliament (JURI) this morning finally agreed on its position on the draft DSM copyright directive. Of course, the plenary is still required to hand down its final vote on JURI’s report. And the trilogue amongst the

DSM Watch: Copyright Directive moves a step closer as EU Council publishes agreed draft

On 25 May 2018, after months of discussions, the EU Council’s Permanent Representatives Committee (COREPER) finally agreed its position on the draft Copyright Directive (see the official press release here), although it has been suggested that Germany, Finland, the Netherlands, Slovenia, Belgium and Hungary did not support it. The agreed text (read it in full

DSM Watch: EU Copyright reform – where do we stand?

Reform of EU copyright is the core of the Commission’s Digital Single Market strategy. Various legislative initiatives have been proposed but the “heart” of the reform is without a doubt the proposal for a new copyright directive. While there appears to be a growing consensus on the wording of most articles, a few key provisions

EU: Portability Regulation – important deadline of 2 June 2018

The Portability Regulation (EU) 2017/1128 came into force on 1 April 2018. Part of the EU Commission’s aim to establish a Digital Single Market, the Regulation facilitates cross-border portability of online content. It allows for subscribed content services to “travel” with the subscriber throughout the entire European Union. Be it movies, sport events, music, e-books,

DSM over lunch with U.S. Copyright Society

We were delighted and honoured to speak at last week’s lunch event of U.S. Copyright Society (CS USA). The Los Angeles Chapter of the CS USA kindly invited Salomé Cisnal de Ugarte (Brussels), Alberto Bellan (Milan) and myself to sit on a panel together with Susan Cleary, Vice President and General Counsel of the Independent Film &

DSM Watch: the new Copyright Directive – recent developments on the proposed Ancillary Right for Press Publishers

The European Parliament’s Rapporteur on the draft Copyright Directive (COM (2016) 593), Axel Voss, released proposed amendments to Article 11 and its corresponding recitals at the end of March. Mr Voss’s draft, for the shadow Rapporteurs on the Parliament’s Committee on Legal Affairs (JURI), introduces a number of remarkable suggested changes, which diverge significantly from

Europe: New Obligations for Platform Operators – Where Do We Stand?

The reform of European Copyright law is at the heart of the European Commission’s efforts to create a true Digital Single Market. The new draft Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market (“Copyright Directive“, COM (2016) 593) dates back to 14 September 2016. Whilst with many provisions of the draft Directive the final wording

DSM Watch: Regulation on Portability of Online Content comes into force 1 April 2018

This year’s Easter holiday brings with it a further milestone in the Commission’s endeavor to bring about a truly Digital Single Market: The Portability Regulation (EU) 2017/1128 comes into force on 1 April 2018. The Regulation facilitates cross-border portability of online content. It allows for subscribed content services to “travel” with the subscriber throughout the

Cross-border parcel delivery – European Parliament approves the regulation proposal

Some time ago now, the European Commission launched an initiative to improve transparency and regulate the cross-border parcel delivery sector as part of its aspiration to create a real Digital Single Market. Clearly, no pan-European online market can exist without a functioning delivery system covering the entirety of the Union. A draft regulation on this

Digital Single Market – New Copyright Directive advances

On 16 January 2018, the Bulgarian Presidency of the EU Council sought guidance from the Permanent Representatives Committee (Coreper) regarding the long-debated Draft Copyright Directive. The queries focused on two issues that are still controversial: the introduction of an ancillary copyright for press publishers (Article 11 of the draft) and the establishment of new monitoring

EU – DSM Watch: Geoblocking – Council approves new regulation

The new provision on the banning of unjustified geoblocking in online sales is at the heart of the EU Commission’s aspiration and effort to create a real Digital Single Market within the European Union. The term “geoblocking” stands for any type of technical or contractual discrimination based on the nationality or residence of a customer.

Geoblocking – EU Parliament approves new regulation

The regulation on measures against unjustified geoblocking is close to become binding law. After the European institutions had reached a compromise on some last open issues in last November, the European Parliament approved the revised draft regulation in its plenary session on Tuesday. The bill sailed through with 557 to 89 votes and 33 abstentions (press