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LimeGreenIP News

Tag Archives: China

Alternative to interlocutory injunctions? Shanghai IP Court innovates with a “partial judgment” on patent infringement

Earlier this year, the Shanghai IP Court (“Court”) handed down an interesting judgment in a patent infringement case between a French car parts manufacturer and three Chinese defendants (two Xiamen, Fujian Province based companies and an individual). On 27 March 2019, upon appeal, the IP Court of Appeal at the Supreme People’s Court upheld the

Hogan Lovells named MIP Global Firm of the Year – Second year running!

Hogan Lovells global IPMT practice has been awarded the accolade of ‘Global IP Firm of the Year’ at the Managing Intellectual Property North America awards – becoming the first firm to win the award in consecutive years and the only firm to win it three times. The award recognizes the strength of our global practice

EUIPO issues a Comparative Case Study on Alternative Resolution Systems for Domain Name Disputes

The European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) recently published a Comparative Case Study on Alternative Resolution Systems for Domain Name Disputes which highlights the main similarities and differences between various Dispute Resolution Procedures (DRPs), analysing in particular the different procedures, fees, timelines and case statistics.  The study also compared the likely outcomes of a few

China breaks new ground with Foreign Investment Law-related IP reform

In a recent move involving both the Chinese legislature (the National People’s Congress) and the executive branch (the State Council), China has overhauled two of its most important pieces of legislation governing inbound IP-related investments. The first major change was the adoption of the new Foreign Investment Law (“FIL”) on 15 March 2019 (full text

China: Would a rose by any other word taste as sweet? Blocking rose-shaped chocolate monopoly in a complex trademark & OEM dispute

Our China team and Hogan Lovells Fidelity have recently secured an important victory for WAWI Xiamen (Chinese subsidiary of the leading German chocolate manufacturer Wawi Group), successfully defending it from a 3D trademark infringement claim before a Chinese court. The case involves cutting-edge IP issues such as the distinctiveness and infringement assessment for 3D-trademarks, and

What you need to know about China’s new Regulations on interim injunctions in IP cases

China’s Supreme People’s Court recently passed its new “Regulations on Certain Issues on the Application of Law for Conduct Preservation in Trials of Intellectual Property Disputes” (“最高人民法院关于审查知识产权纠纷行为保全案件适用法律若干问题的规定”, “Regulations”). The Regulations came into effect on 1 January 2019. The Regulations apply to applications for interim injunctions (which includes both preliminary and interlocutory injunctions, in Chinese “诉前禁令”

China Trademarks: 2018 Highlights & 2019 Forecast

Last year, right holders in China have seen a number of major developments including; a milestone Supreme Court judgment dealing with trademark squatting, new specialized cyberspace courts, a new E-Commerce law, clarification on OEM trademark infringement; and the first court appeal granting registration of a sound mark. This year, further developments are expected with; the

China: Appetite for anti-unfair competition action in the Internet space

It’s been almost a year since the new “Internet clause” in China’s Anti-Unfair Competition Law (AUCL) is in force. The enforcement authority hasn’t used it much in 2018. But one decision is noteworthy. AUCL amendment On 1 January 2018, the first amendment to the AUCL since its enactment in 1993 came into effect. One of

China’s highest court slams trademark squatter, confirming that hoarding trademarks is unlawful

In a recent judgment, China’s highest court, the Supreme People’s Court (“SPC”), dealt a significant blow to trademark squatters. The case is noteworthy for several reasons: First of all, the case was likely selected as a landmark case by the SPC, since the Court accepted to hear the retrial procedure, even though it fully maintained

To tariff or not to tariff: China’s alleged intellectual property theft from the United States

As of this writing, the United States recently halted trade negotiations with China particularly as related to trade tariffs for alleged “unfair trade practices” under Section 301. Though it may be popular to label the Trump administration’s latest tariffs on China as part of an ongoing “trade war”, the response elides a significant point: that

China: New national-level Appeal Court – Cautious hopes for improved consistency and efficiency in high-tech IP / patent cases

On 26 October 2018, the Standing Committee of China’s National People’s Congress (NPC) issued a Decision setting out the establishment of a new IP Court of Appeals at the national level within the Supreme People’s Court (SPC). This Decision will come into effect on 1 January 2019. The Decision provides that the SPC will have

Hogan Lovells Standard Essential Patent Update (English, 日本語 & 한국어)

In this edition of Hogan Lovells’ Standard Essential Patent (SEP) Update, we report on recent news and case decisions from China, Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. This bi-monthly newsletter summarizes the more notable SEP developments from key litigation arenas for owners and prospective licensees. 日本語 – Japanese language translation available here 한국어 – Korean

Key trademark decision secured for ZF before China’s highest court.

A team from our Shanghai IP Agency and Hogan Lovells Fidelity  has recently obtained a remarkable trademark decision for its client ZF and its affiliate ZF TRW Automotive Holdings (“ZF TRW”) before China’s highest court, the Supreme People’s Court (“SPC”). The case revolved around ZF TRW’s opposition action against a trademark application for its brand “TRW,”

A game changer? China enacts first e-commerce law

In stark contrast to the rapid development of e-commerce in China, it has taken nearly five years and no less than four drafts for China to finalise its first e-Commerce Law. The new law will enter into force on 1 January 2019. This new law has a remarkably broad scope, encompassing many aspects of e-commerce,

China IP litigation and prosecution statistics: taking a step back to see the bigger picture.

According to several recent publications by Chinese governmental authorities, both IP litigation and IP prosecution numbers in China continue to increase significantly. In this article, we provide an overview of those combined statistics, and analyze how this might have an impact on your business in China.   China IP litigation numbers

Hong Kong & cross-border IP disputes: Practical tips on arbitrating

While traditionally resolved through litigation, parties are now increasingly referring their intellectual property right (IPR) disputes to arbitration, especially in cases where there is a cross-border element. Building upon our earlier guide to arbitration agreements for IP, this post provides an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of arbitrating IP disputes, addresses two main concerns (Arbitrability of the

Total Brand Care: How to legally obtain your desired brand

Brands can use trademarks to gain a competitive advantage in today’s crowded marketplace.  An iconic trademark can be one of your biggest assets; a core component of your identity; and a practical solution to prevent others profiting from your success.  But navigating the complexities of trademark law around the world is a challenge for many brands. 

Brand Benchmarking 2018: Trademark challenges and opportunities in China

In the first of a series of articles looking in more depth at the findings of the Brand Benchmarking 2018 report, we examine trends in China and East Asia. East Asia (comprising China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan) features prominently in the latest Brand Benchmarking report, while China specifically tops the list of challenging jurisdictions but

Moscow: Asia IP seminar review

At the end of June, Hogan Lovells inaugurated its new office premises in Moscow with Partner Natalia Gulyaeva hosting the first seminar of our Russia-Asia IP series with Vietnam IP Counsel Nga Nguyen and Hogan Lovells Fidelity China Senior Associate Julia Peng. More than 20 business leaders from the professional services, automotive, consumer products and technology

Setting the right example: China’s Supreme People’s Court selects the top 10 IP cases of 2017

China’s Supreme People’s Court (“SPC”) has recently published its list of the “top 10 significant IP cases” for 2017, which it has done yearly since 2007. Although these cases are not strictly binding precedents under China’s civil law system, these cases are used as persuasive judicial guidance for China’s courts at all levels. In this

Standard essential patents in the automotive industry – Webinar recording

Earlier this month we held the third in our LimeGreen Live webinar series, in conjunction with Hogan Lovells Automotive and Mobility Industry Sector Group This webinar explored recent SEP case developments in three key jurisdictions—the U.S., Germany, and China. The speakers were three members of our global patent team handling automotive patent litigation and SEP disputes: Katie Feng (China), Joe Raffetto

Asia IP Webinar – Parallel imports: Good, bad or ugly?

Parallel imports may trigger controversial IP issues across the world and can be a headache for brand owners if not addressed strategically. In this webinar, our team of IP lawyers from our Shanghai, Beijing, Hong Kong, Tokyo and Ho Chi Minh City offices will: provide an overview of the situation in China, Hong Kong, Japan and

Huawei v. Samsung — A new benchmark for standard essential patent litigation in China?

China has become a new battlefield in the global patent war amongst tech giants in the telecom industry. On 4 January 2018, the Shenzhen Intermediate People’s Court (“Court“) rendered a landmark judgment in the Huawei v. Samsung standard essential patent (“SEPs“) case that is expected to reshape dynamics between the SEP licensors and licensees. On

China’s Advertising Law – That fine is (chest)nuts!

In a recent decision, a Chinese court imposed a fine lower than the statutory range under the Advertising Law of the People’s Republic of China (as amended in 2015) (“Advertising Law“). This suggests that courts retain certain discretion in reducing statutory sanctions under the Advertising Law. This decision, while not binding on other courts and